The Best Apple Pie Ever

In our region apples had a very good year and the trees were loaded! While we don’t have apple trees on our property we have a few people we call “apple angels” that let us come pick their trees when there is an over abundance. I processed about 4 bushels of apples this season into apple sauce, apple peel jelly, apple pie filling, and I made my personal best record of fresh apple pies. My apple corer peeler had seen a lot of action, so much in fact that I’ve actually began to enjoy the monotonous task to the point that its almost become a zen thing for me. I just fill the sink with apples, give them a nice swishing around in fresh water with a splash of vinegar and start cranking away, often forgetting to count out the apples as I go. To make sure I’ve got enough apples prepared for the empty pie shells waiting to be filled on the counter I find that going through my apple scraps and counting cores works perfectly for when I’ve zoned out and forgotten to count. Or you could just count them out ahead of time…I just like to live on the edge apparently.

Coring and peeling, peeling and coring

I’ve even roped my kids into helping! Little O enjoys it just as much as I do, and Jake likes to crank in the wrong direction. The other night O helped me peel and core a whole bushel of apples! We made 7 apple pies and the rest of the apples were loaded onto the trays of my dehydrator and dried into what is probably one of our favorite snacks.

I’d like to share my apple pie recipe with you, its got to be my favorite apple pie I have ever eaten…maybe it simply tastes so good because I made it myself, or maybe it really is The Best Apple Pie Ever. I do know this: So long as you bake it, it will always be the best.

The Best Apple Pie Ever

For the crust:

• 1-1/2 cup flour
• 2 tablespoon sugar
• 1/2 teaspoon salt
• 2 tablespoon + teaspoon cold lard or Crisco
• 1/3 cup butter
• 1/4 cup cold water

1. Add all ingredients to a large bowl, using a pastry blender or fingertips work the lard into the flour, then slowly add water continuing to blend until dough begins to stick together.

2. Roll into a ball and turn out onto plastic wrap and chill up to 3 hours.

3. Before baking, remove from plastic wrap, roll dough out, and place in pie pan.

For the Filling:

6 Apples (a variety of tart and sweet)

1 ¼ tsp Cinnamon

¾ cup Sugar + more for top

Sprinkle of Nutmeg

½ tsp Vanilla

1 Tbs Lemon Juice

3 Tbs Minute Tapioca

1 whole egg beaten for top

1. Fold all ingredients together.

  1. Pour into prepared crust, apply top crust in your preferred method.
  2. Brush top with beaten egg & sprinkle with sugar.
  3. Place pie on a cookie sheet, cover top in foil. Bake at 425 for 20 minutes, remove foil. Reduce temperature to 375 and bake for 25 minutes.

Homemade Applesauce

 

This year my family got together and made applesauce for the first time. We had not only 2 bushels of FREE apples, but we also had a free day this weekend to make SAUCE. Happy Dance. And by “free day” I mean, “We are already canning 40 lbs of beef this weekend so we might as well …”

Funny how everything has to come at once. We had planned on doing the applesauce, then we got that faithful call from the meat processor that our steer was ready for pick up. All blessings of course … we have meat for our freezer and tasty applesauce for the dead of winter. The work is totally worth it. Plus you get the added bonus of family time, and passing traditions down through the generations.

No extra acid was used in our recipe, you can add lemon or citric acid, however some claim that it causes an off flavor so we opted out. Sugar is an optional add in too, it all comes down to taste. Since the babies would be the main eaters of the applesauce we chose to not add sugar. The apples we had were a mix of lord-knows-what varying in texture, size, color, and acidity. Our end product had enough acid that we were comfortable skipping it and the sugar both, simply for taste reasons and safety, too.

Lets get to it then!

Apples

Acquire your apples. You want a nice mix of sweet and tart apples. We aren’t really sure what kind of apples we ended up with, but we could tell that there were three distinct varieties ranging from tart to sweet and crisp to soft.

Coring and Peeling

Core and peel your apples. You can see we saved our skins and cores and stuffed them in half gallon jars for apple cider vinegar making. Another blog for another time.

Cored and Peeled Apples

A pot of cored and peeled apples ready for cooking.

Apples Cooking Down

Apples cooking down. We worked in batches with two large pots on the stove. Cook them until they are nice and soft and easily mashable.

Mixing applesauce

We used a hand mixer in the pot to “sauce” our sauce. It has some teeny weenie chunks in it. It’s homemade, the perfection is in the imperfection.

Filling Jars

Fill your jars. We use a 2 cup measuring cup to scoop into jars rather than a ladle. We find that we have more control over the lava hot substance, and it takes less trips from the heat source to the jars. Be sure to tap your jars gently to get out all the air bubbles or stick a utensil down into the jars to free up bubbles.

In The Bath

Add your jars to the hot water bath canner. Wait for the water to boil then set your timer for 20 minutes. Remove your jars and let them cool on a towel. The sound of can lids popping is the best sound in the world!

Happy Applesauce Making!