The Best Apple Pie Ever

In our region apples had a very good year and the trees were loaded! While we don’t have apple trees on our property we have a few people we call “apple angels” that let us come pick their trees when there is an over abundance. I processed about 4 bushels of apples this season into apple sauce, apple peel jelly, apple pie filling, and I made my personal best record of fresh apple pies. My apple corer peeler had seen a lot of action, so much in fact that I’ve actually began to enjoy the monotonous task to the point that its almost become a zen thing for me. I just fill the sink with apples, give them a nice swishing around in fresh water with a splash of vinegar and start cranking away, often forgetting to count out the apples as I go. To make sure I’ve got enough apples prepared for the empty pie shells waiting to be filled on the counter I find that going through my apple scraps and counting cores works perfectly for when I’ve zoned out and forgotten to count. Or you could just count them out ahead of time…I just like to live on the edge apparently.

Coring and peeling, peeling and coring

I’ve even roped my kids into helping! Little O enjoys it just as much as I do, and Jake likes to crank in the wrong direction. The other night O helped me peel and core a whole bushel of apples! We made 7 apple pies and the rest of the apples were loaded onto the trays of my dehydrator and dried into what is probably one of our favorite snacks.

I’d like to share my apple pie recipe with you, its got to be my favorite apple pie I have ever eaten…maybe it simply tastes so good because I made it myself, or maybe it really is The Best Apple Pie Ever. I do know this: So long as you bake it, it will always be the best.

The Best Apple Pie Ever

For the crust:

• 1-1/2 cup flour
• 2 tablespoon sugar
• 1/2 teaspoon salt
• 2 tablespoon + teaspoon cold lard or Crisco
• 1/3 cup butter
• 1/4 cup cold water

1. Add all ingredients to a large bowl, using a pastry blender or fingertips work the lard into the flour, then slowly add water continuing to blend until dough begins to stick together.

2. Roll into a ball and turn out onto plastic wrap and chill up to 3 hours.

3. Before baking, remove from plastic wrap, roll dough out, and place in pie pan.

For the Filling:

6 Apples (a variety of tart and sweet)

1 ¼ tsp Cinnamon

¾ cup Sugar + more for top

Sprinkle of Nutmeg

½ tsp Vanilla

1 Tbs Lemon Juice

3 Tbs Minute Tapioca

1 whole egg beaten for top

1. Fold all ingredients together.

  1. Pour into prepared crust, apply top crust in your preferred method.
  2. Brush top with beaten egg & sprinkle with sugar.
  3. Place pie on a cookie sheet, cover top in foil. Bake at 425 for 20 minutes, remove foil. Reduce temperature to 375 and bake for 25 minutes.

A Winter Solstice Celebration

The winter solstice, also known as “Midwinter” and “The Longest Night” marks the astronomical beginning of winter as well as the shortest day and longest night of the year. After this date (occurring between the 20th-22nd   of December each year) our daylight hours will begin to get longer, but we still have three more months of winter until spring. We decided to begin a new tradition to celebrate not only the winter season, but our neighborhood wildlife that we get so much joy from observing throughout the year.

Suet cake in a re-purposed mug!

Winter marks the beginning of a time of hardship for our wild friends, even though they are perfectly equipped to cope with the harsh outdoor environment, food is not as plentiful as it is in the summer months. So to give them a little boost this is when we hang our suet feeders, peanut cages, and keep our seed feeders full. To make it a little more special we chose a tree in our yard to decorate with some festive treats too!

A string of popcorn and cranberries!
Cranberry & Orange Ornament

Popcorn Strings!: Since these are for wild birds that could be harmed by ingesting string or thread, I chose to string our popcorn on a length of wire.  Birds wont be able to take any with them when they grab a kernel and it eliminates the needle from the equation making this a kid friendly project! We popped plain popcorn in a pot on the stove with a bit of melted tallow instead of our usual bacon fat (yes we really do that and it is amazing). For a splash of color and a little vitamin C and moisture for our feathery friends I added fresh cranberries to the strings, as well as orange slices.

A Polar Bear Bird ‘Cookie”

Bird Friendly “Cookies” are also on the menu Preheat your oven to 350 and combine in the bowl of a food processor until very sticky:

1 cup dried dates & dehydrated apples

½ cup oatmeal

½ cup raisins

¼ unsalted sunflower seeds

¼ cup meal worms (optional)

Transfer mixture to a large bowl and add two Tablespoons natural peanut butter, and one Tablespoon raw honey, stir until thoroughly incorporated, mixture will become hard to stir.  Press into cookie cutter shapes and bake for 20 minutes. Cool, string on wire and hang.

Don’t Forget Good Ole Rabbit: For our very plentiful population of wild rabbits, carrots and apples will be roughly chopped and placed in areas they are known to frequent. Corn cobs will be added to our squirrel feeder…maybe now they’ll stay out of our garage.

What about water? A lot of people express concern about where birds get water in the winter when all fresh water sources are frozen. Rest assured that their water requirements are met by eating snow and wild berries and fruit. But an open water source is always appreciated. You can find various heated bird baths available on the market and you may find that your yard becomes a hot bed of wild bird activity. Purchase a low to the ground bath if you wish to give your rabbit visitors a drink as well.

But where do they sleep?  I have often found myself wondering this same question on blustery cold nights.  Much like our chickens in the coop, wild birds roost together in large groups to conserve heat. They choose tree cavities, the root balls of upturned trees, and the eves and rafters of old barns.  Some species of wild birds will over-winter as a family in the birdhouse they claimed in the spring, so you may want to think twice before you clean it out at the end of the year. – I’d even use it as an excuse to leave that brush pile until spring.  Bird watchers can catch wild birds roosting just after sunset.

A note regarding the special treats mentioned in this article: The popcorn strings, and bird cookies will only be presented on this day until they are gone and they will not be available to wildlife the entire season to prevent dependence on them. If you live in an area that prohibits the feeding of wildlife, please observe these rules as they are there to protect not only the wildlife, but you and your family as well.

Homemade Suet Cakes

Our family loves wildlife and we spend a lot of time looking out the windows watching the birds. Slowly our boys are learning some of the more easily identifiable species, like robins and cardinals. Not too shabby for two year olds!  To keep our avian entertainment steady we hang bird feeders. When the weather starts getting cooler with winter around the corner I like to provide suet cakes. Suet cakes provide a high energy, easily digestible food source which is invaluable in winter months when regular meals can be harder to find. They are also really easy to make yourself! Since they are made from beef fat (suet) and they can go rancid sitting on a store shelf for months at a time coupled with the fact that ingredients like peanuts and fruit can support mold growth, Serious birders recommend making your own suet cakes rather than purchasing them. Oh! And they cost about .50 cents each to make, so if that doesn’t push you over the edge on your decision I don’t know what would. Take care to only feed suet cakes in the winter months when temperatures are freezing. Feeding suet in warm weather can cause birds belly feathers to get coated in suet during nesting season. When they sit on their eggs the suet can coat the porous shells of their eggs, thereby preventing the embryo from getting the oxygen it needs for proper development.

Beef suet that has been rendered (a product now called “tallow”) that has been cooled then cut into chunks to be used in various applications.

You can visit your favorite butcher and ask for suet by the pound, it’s really cheap. I like to buy 5 pounds at a time and I ask them to cut it up into small chunks, or better yet grind it up for me. Then I put it in the crock pot on low until it is melted (there will be some solid pieces floating around) then using a paper towel lined mesh strainer, strain the now rendered suet into a bowl. Toss out the solid pieces – that is of course unless you enjoy cracklin’s… From here you can go straight to making your suet cakes.

Add 5 cups birdseed to 4 cups melted suet.
Allow the mixture to cool until it begins to turn opaque. This helps the seeds to stay suspended in the fat.

 

Working in small batches, stir 5 cups of birdseed into 4 cups melted suet. Let this mixture set until the suet begins to cool and turn slightly opaque, then stir it well to make sure the seed is evenly disbursed. This ensures that all the seed will stay suspended in the suet rather than sinking to the bottom. Pour mixture into a paper milk carton with the top cut off to make suet cakes to fit in square suet feeders. Allow it to cool at room temperature on your counter, or to speed the process place it in your fridge. When they are solid cut away the paper carton, allow them to come to room temperature and cut into 1 ½ inch chunks with a hot knife just like an ice cream cake! My favorite way to make these is to pour the suet mixture into a mini bundt or doughnut pan to make wreaths, and there is no cutting involved! They make awesome gifts for any bird lover! Store finished suet cakes in the fridge or freezer until needed. – The “flavor” possibilities are endless too, add peanuts and peanut butter, meal worms, cranberries, dried fruits, and any variety of seeds you wish!

Cut the suet cakes with a hot knife
Homemade Suet Cakes
Alternately, you can pour the suet mixture into molds that make for easy hanging.

I hope your family enjoys making these as much as we do!

SUET CAKE RECIPE:

4 Cups rendered beef suet

5 Cups Bird Seed mixture of preference

Cranberries, peanuts, peanut butter, meal worms, dried fruit of your choice (optional)

Yield: 1 paper carton = about 4 suet cakes or 6 mini bundt wreaths

Working in small batches, stir 5 cups of birdseed into 4 cups melted suet. Let this mixture set until the suet begins to cool and turn slightly opaque, then stir it well to make sure the seed is evenly disbursed. This ensures that all the seed will stay suspended in the suet rather than sinking to the bottom. Pour mixture into a paper milk carton with the top cut off to make suet cakes to fit in square suet feeders. Allow it to cool at room temperature on your counter, or to speed the process place it in your fridge. When they are solid cut away the paper carton, allow them to come to room temperature and cut into 1 ½ inch chunks with a hot knife just like an ice cream cake! Or pour into mini bundt or donut pans.

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