How To Freeze Blackberries (And pretty much every other berry for that matter)

Blackberries bring back a lot of memories for me.  My Grandma Newt used to take us to Aunt Jan’s house, usually because I begged and begged to go see her beautiful buckskin gelding “Buck”, and the best donkey in the world “George”.  I always got to sit on Buck, my sister always managed to get George, a point that would be (and still is) brought up to me throughout the years. – I got the horse and my sister got the ass.  There has to be a photo somewhere of an ecstatic me on Buck and a happy but slightly miffed Lauren atop of George.  Both were calm elderly creatures that were treated like kings and we always brought them apples and carrots and plenty of scratches for their ears and backs.  They were well loved and lived to very old ages, both being 36 years old or more before passing.

Big Beautiful Ripe Blackberries

Aunt Jan also had an enormous back berry patch.  I could not reach the top of canes, and they had to be about 4 feet thick.  We’d pick a quart or two and want to go make jam with Newt (because she makes the best jam).  But what happened inevitably every. single. time. was Newt would come out and see so many unpicked berries…the biggest best berries left behind for the birds, which was simply not allowed.  There was a reason they were unpicked, these berries were about 3 feet back into the impenetrable bramble thicket and grandma wasn’t satisfied until we pressed back there and became human pin cushions.  By this time my sister had retreated to George and Buck and I was left picking the damned berries.  At least I got to munch them as I went along, which one day came to a screeching halt when I popped a berry into my mouth and felt something cling to my tongue, panicking spit everything out but the thing was still stuck there, by now I’m totally freaking out so gather up the balls and I reach in and pull out a japanese beetle.  Blackberries weren’t the same for years after that.

Sometimes blackberries begin to ripen at uneven intervals and the easiest way to accumulate the quantities needed for large recipes is to freeze them as they come in, and it couldn’t be simpler.

How To Freeze Blackberries:

  • Rinse berries
  • Dry them on a towel you wouldn’t mind getting stained
  • Spread them one layer thick on a cookie sheet, and freeze 4 hours or overnight
  • Place in a freezer safe container of your choice

To use them after they’ve been frozen, measure when they are still frozen then allow them to thaw.  Drain excess liquid and use in the recipe as directed.

 

 

 

The Very Best Rhubarb Pie

Confession time: Until this year I’ve never eaten or made a rhubarb pie. Feels really good to have that sin off my chest. I really don’t know what the reason is for it, other than I always ate rhubarb raw and maybe the thought of it in a pie was kind of a turn off? Well, whatever the reason my heart or my shoes, I’d always hated rhubarb pie. Completely without cause too, since I had never even tried it. Then Last year I made some amazing strawberry rhubarb jam and that was the turning point, I immediately regretted all the wasted years. I had a bag of frozen rhubarb tucked away in the freezer and I busted it out to create a masterpiece. I think I have made this pie the most so far this year, my husband loves it and so does everyone I share it with, so I’d like to share it with you too!

Crust: (make two)

1 ½ cup flour

2Tbs sugar

½ tsp salt

1/3 cup cold lard cubed +2Tbs

¼ cup ice cold water

+ 1 beaten egg for brushing the top

pulse all ingredients in the bowl of a food processor, slowly drizzle in ice water until a slightly crumbly dough is formed. Chill dough for at least 3 hours before rolling on a floured surface.

Filling:

4 cups chopped rhubarb

½ cup brown sugar

½ cup sugar

2 Tbs lemon juice

1 tsp cinnamon

1 8oz jar strawberry jam

3 Tbs minute tapioca

Tip: if you are working with frozen rhubarb, measure while it is still frozen, then allow it to thaw. Drain excess water, then use in recipe as directed.

Stir all ingredients in a large bowl, pour into prepared pie crust and add top crust in lattice style. Brush Top crust with beaten egg and sprinkle with course sugar. Cover top with foil. Preheat oven to 425, bake for 20 minutes, change temperature to 375 and continue to bake for 45-60 min (until filling is bubbly) , remove foil with 20 min remaining. Cool and serve with ice cream.

Cultivating and Preserving Rhubarb

 

Rhubarb is a fantastic low maintenance perennial garden vegetable that comes back every year stronger and more productive than the last. Grown for its tart petioles (leafstalks), rhubarb is most commonly considered a fruit in the United States and is typically used in baking. Use it to stretch strawberry preserves, add a little zing to savory dishes as a sauce, make a satisfying cocktail, or just wash it off with the hose and eat it straight out of the garden. As kids my sister and I would routinely sneak stalks from our aunt Brenda’s rhubarb plant. We’d sprinkle them with salt, plop down on her back steps and munch. It wasn’t until recently that I had ever eaten cooked rhubarb in any form, I’d turn my nose up thinking it was something to be crunched raw. But I’ve fallen in love with the unique flavor it brings to almost everything, especially pies.

Rhubarb Patch

Cultivation:

To give your plants a great start select a well drained location that is seldom disturbed in the garden for your rhubarb to live– the plants will be productive for 5 years or many more. Mounds or raised beds amended with compost make the ideal home for rhubarb. Plant crowns two inches below the soil, at least 3 feet apart, and mulch them with straw to keep the weeds down. Ample space is needed as the plants will get quite large when mature. The first year after planting you wont want to harvest any stalks, as tempting as it can be. You want the plant to focus on growing a strong root system, not growing stalks. In the second year harvest for only 1-2 weeks, when the plant is in its third year you can harvest for 8-10 weeks and this is considered a full harvest. Only harvest 1/3rd of the plant at a time, taking too much can cause the plant stress and it wont be as productive. By August you should be leaving the plant alone so it can send enough nutrients to the crown to prepare for the impending winter months. When harvesting pull stalks from the crown – don’t cut them off. This action helps to keep the plant productive and healthy. Remember to remove the leaves before consuming as they contain high levels of oxalic acid which is toxic to humans. After 5 years of full harvest you can dig up the crown and divide it into 4-6 pieces, so long as each piece has a strong bud. replant the cuttings to revive your patch or give them to friends to spread the rhubarb love. Rhubarb is a hardy perennial, and doesn’t require mulching or any other sort of babying to make it through our tough Michigan winters, which is great because we all have enough to deal with as it is.

Common Issues:

Sometimes you may notice in the spring that your rhubarb is trying to flower, as soon as you see flower heads, cut them back to the crown. Again, you want the plant to focus on being vegetative and making leafstalks for you to eat, not reproducing. I highly suggest spending a little more money for a propagated variety (Canada Red for example), these plants are started from splitting a crown, rather than a cheaper plant that was started by seed. Rhubarb started by seed is prone to bolting, (or wanting to go to seed) as soon as conditions are right you will see them forcing up flower heads and you will have to continually battle for petiole production. Stress can also cause your rhubarb to flower. Planting crowns too close together so the plants have to compete for space can cause even a nice variety to want to go to seed. Weeds should be kept down around the plants with the use of straw or grass clipping mulch. Also all patches of wild curly dock need to be removed from the area, since they are in the rhubarb family and carry many of the same diseases that plague rhubarb.

Rhubarb Ready For The Freezer

Preserving the harvest:

Preparing your rhubarb harvest for for preservation is crazy easy, and it’s probably one of my favorite things about it, simply…

  • Pull Stalks
  • Rinse and chop into 1” pieces
  • Arrange in a single layer on a cookie sheet
  • Freeze 4 hours or overnight
  • Remove from cookie sheet and dump into freezer safe container of your choice

To use after freezing:

Always measure for your recipe while the food is still frozen, then allow it to thaw to room temperature . Drain excess water then use in your recipe as directed. This little tip makes all the difference when cooking with frozen produce.